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Lisa Espenmiller: The Way, Where You Come From.

Contmporary Bay Area Artist, Lisa Espenmiller

California Bay Area Contemporary Artist, Lisa Espenmiller “The Way”, uses line, movement, and space to focus intent on material and repetition of pattern, in a meditative process. Hers is a controlled technique akin to writing on a scroll. Espenmiller draws horizontal ink lines, one after the other, until the entire surface of canvas or paper becomes a field of meditative resonance. The lines and washes of color in her paintings are visual descriptions of the chi or breath-energy that flows through all things.1

“I have this notion that art occurs in the process of life itself, and you don’t have to go outside of the context of your own life. It’s all there, and you just tap into it. You open up to it. You have to make yourself available to possibilities.”
David Ireland, he Art of David IrelandThe Way Things Are 2

Lisa Espenmiller "Begin in the small," 2013 acrylic and ink on canvas over panel 20 x 20 inches
Lisa Espenmiller
“Begin in the small,” 2013
acrylic and ink on canvas over panel
20 x 20 inches
Lisa Espenmiller "Born in the void" 2013 acrylic and ink on canvas over panel 20 x 20 inches
Lisa Espenmiller
“Born in the void” 2013
acrylic and ink on canvas over panel
20 x 20 inches
Know when to stop, 2012 acrylic & ink on canvas over panel 24" x 24"
Lisa Espenmiller
“Know when to stop”, 2012
acrylic & ink on canvas over panel
24″ x 24″
Nothing slips through, 2014 acrylic & ink on canvas over panel 30" x 30"
Lisa Espenmiller
“Nothing slips through”, 2014
acrylic & ink on canvas over panel
30″ x 30″
Espenmiller.Ofitsownaccord.acrylinkoncanvas.24x24.1200
Lisa Espenmiller
“Of its own accord “
acrylic & ink on canvas over panel
24″ x 24″
Lisa Espenmiller, "Some breathe gently", 2013 | acrylic & ink on canvas over panel | 36" x 36"
Lisa Espenmiller
“Some breathe gently”, 2013
acrylic & ink on canvas over panel
36″ x 36″

Artist’s Statement

The lines and washes of color in my paintings and works on paper, visual descriptions of the chi or breath-energy that flows through all things, seek to sober and quiet the mind. When the mind quiets it becomes susceptible to inspiration, to movement from the microcosmic to the macrocosmic. Whether the body of work attempts to depict the inner scenery of breath-energy (The Way, Where you come from), the ever-shifting inner and outer landscape (the groundless ground), or talismanic power (chant), the goal is to engender a stilling of the hyperactive mind so the viewer can recognize the existence of a source that transcends human or divine authority – what Lao Tzu refers to as “dark-enigma” – the chi-tissue of empirical reality and the empty opening of consciousness itself.

The paintings and works on paper function both as mirror and window. Viewers are encouraged to stand before each one allowing the piece to offer a reflection of what’s inside or a view into another layer of reality. Think of them as modern mandalas or yantras.

As in meditation, my process requires that I remain rooted and immersed in the realization of the piece for a focused, uninterrupted period of time. There is little time or space for the logical mind to intervene in an attempt to control the outcome. The pace of each line, the movement of the brush or pen are guided by intuition and “no-mind,” accepting and trusting what presents itself in each fluid, changing moment.

These Featured works by Lisa Espenmiller are presented by Art Consultant, Laurie Ghielmetti Interiors + Art 3 and can be viewed at Garden Court Antiques at our 151 Vermont Street Showroom in San Francisco’s South of Market Design Neighborhood.

Artist’s Social Portals

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Further readings and sources:

Show 3 Footnotes

  1. Facebook Page: On the Line: Artist Talk with Sabine Reckewell, Lisa Espenmiller & Cathy Kimball
  2. The Art of David IrelandThe Way Things Are. Karen Tsujimoto (Author), Jennifer Gross, Author, University of California Press
  3. Fine Arts Consultant, Laurie Ghielmetti Interior + Art
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Connie Goldman: The Constancy of Change and The Predictability of Uncertainty.

Much of Bay Area Artist, Connie Goldman’s 1 work relates to upset equilibrium and the tension between stasis and flux. Her work is reductive and abstract yet deeply personal. As with equilibrium, it is not static but always on the brink of changing in one form or another.

As part of our Temporary Contemporary Fine Arts Exhibit Garden Court has introduced Connie Goldman’s abstracts to our Vermont Center Gallery. Combining contemporary alongside the antique reflect the juxtaposed styles of designers and collectors today. Our Fine Arts Exhibit is presented by Art Consultant, Laurie Ghielmetti Interior + Art 2.

Phasis Series

Phasis n. a manner, stage, or aspect of being; phase .

Phase n. (1) any of the major appearances or aspects in which a thing of varying modes or conditions manifests itself to the eye or mind (2) a stage in a process of change or development (3) the particular appearance presented by the moon or a planet at a given time.

Lunar Phase Lunar phase refers to the appearance of the illuminated portion of the Moon as seen by an observer, (usually) on earth.

The multiple panels allow for time elapsed and changing points of view. These pieces speak to the constancy of change, the predictability of uncertainty. 3

The creative process for Ms Goldman often begins with sketches and words. Phasis began with sketches ( At point 1:25 in the video above ) and a rift on ‘Phases of the Moon’. A self-confessed ‘Geek’, Ms Goldman loves words. She will sit and read the dictionary. “Language, music, poetry”, she says,”has a certain meter to it, a regularity like our own heartbeat”. She’s also a “Quote Junkie” having collected thousands of them over the years. These quotes serve as a type of shortcut to express ideas and a personal point of view. Ms Goldman read a few of her favorite quotes to Blogger, Phillip J. Mellen of Ahtcast in a 2013 interview. 4

Robert Henri 5 (leading figure in the Ashcan Art Movement 6 of the early twentieth century): “The object isn’t to make art, It’s to be in that wonderful state which makes art inevitable” 7

Frank Lobdell 8: “Sometimes it’s not what one puts into a painting but rather what one leaves out that makes a compelling picture.” 9

Pearl Buck 10: “The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: a human creature born abnormally, inhumanly sensitive. To them a touch is a blow, a sound is a noise, a misfortune is a tragedy, a joy is an ecstacy, a friend is a lover, a lover is a God, and failure is death. Add to this cruelly delicate organism, the overpowering necessity to create, create, create, so that without the creating of music, or poetry, or books or buildings or of something of meaning, their very breath is cut off. They must create — must pour out creation. By some strange unknown urgency, they are not really alive unless they are creating. “ 11

Patti Smith 12: “In art and dream may you proceed with abandon. In life, may you proceed with balance and stealth.” 13

Marcel Proust 14 : “The real voyage of discovery consists in not seeking new landscapes but having new eyes.” 15

Anais Nin 16: “There came a time when the risk to remain tight in the bud was more painful than the risks it took to blossom.” 17

Constantin Brâncuși 18 : on Abstraction. “When you see a fish, you don’t think of its scales, do you? You think of it’s speed, it’s floating, flashing body seen through the water. If I make fins and eyes and scales I would arrest its movement. Give it pattern or shape of reality. I just want the flash of the spirit. “ 19

Paul Cézanne 20: “Painting is damned difficult. You always think you’ve got it but you haven’t. I could paint for a hundred years, a thousand years, without stopping and I would still feel as though I knew nothing.” 21

Abstract Artist, Connie Goldman
Bay Area Abstract Artist, Connie Goldman.

Asked to apply three to five words to describe her work, Ms Goldman responded, “Quiet, understated, musical. My work is far-reaching, referencing other disciplines, language and music; the spaces that exist in music, haiku, proportion.” The creative process is never-ending. Of her work, Ms Goldman observes: “You can’t master it. You can’t completely master it.”

Artist Statement

Using a minimalist vocabulary and a reductive aesthetic that emphasizes the importance of space, rhythm, structure, and relations, I make works of art that are concrete and essential approximations of my own emotional and intellectual experiences. The work reflects my interests in architecture, music, science, sculpture, and painting as well as the threads of commonality that run between them.

The tendency or desire to gravitate toward unity and stability is in opposition to the urge toward independence, transition, and growth. My work evokes this same tension, the dynamic that underlies my own existence. I see each piece as being analogous to the rhythmic and contradictory forces of stasis and flux that propel my world toward both constancy and change.

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Further readings and sources:

Show 21 Footnotes

  1. The Artist’s website
  2. Fine Arts Consultant, Laurie Ghielmetti Interior + Art
  3. Phasis – the Artist’s website
  4. Soundcloud Ahtcast Artist Interview with Connie Goldman
  5. Robert Henri (June 24, 1865 – July 12, 1929) was an American painter and teacher
  6. The Ashcan School or Ash Can School
  7. Robert Henri Quotes Goodreads.com
  8. Frank Lobdell (1921 – 2013) American painter, often associated with the Bay Area Figurative Movement and Bay Area Abstract Expressionism
  9. Frank Lobdell: “Nothing Worth Anything Is Easy”
  10. Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973), American writer and novelist
  11. Pearl S. Buck Quotes Goodreads.com
  12. Patricia Lee ‘Patti’ Smith (born December 30, 1946) American singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist an influential component of the New York City seventies punk rock movement.
  13. Rolling Stone: Patti Smith: Family Life, Recent Loss, and New Album ‘Gone Again’ by David Fricke, July 11, 1996.
  14. Marcel Proust ( July 10, 1871 – November 18, 1922 ) French novelist, critic, and essayist
  15. Marcel Proust Quotes Goodreads.com
  16. Anaïs Nin ( February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977 ) author
  17. Anaïs Nin – Wikiquote ; see ‘disputed’
  18. Constantin Brâncuși ( February 19, 1876 – March 16, 1957 ) Romanian sculptor, painter and photographer; considered a pioneer of modernism, one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th-century, ‘patriarch of modern sculpture’
  19. Constantin Brancusi Quotes Goodreads.com
  20. Paul Cézanne ( January 19, 1839 – October 22, 1906 ) French artist and Post-Impressionist painter
  21. Paul Cézanne’s Quotes
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Ann Holsberry: Nomadic by Nature.

Ann Holsberry, Artist
Ann Holsberry, Artist

Bay Area Artist, Ann Holsberry, works in cyanotype1, a kind of photographic printmaking that yields a rich Prussian blue combined with gouache (an opaque watercolor paint). She uses this process in a painterly manner to convey vast impressions of the oceans and cerulean skies in her Migration series which is now on display at Garden Court’s Vermont Center Showroom presented by Art Consultant, Laurie Ghielmetti Interiors + Art 2

Holsberry’s Migration series is fluid and ever-changing. Using a combination of source materials—her Qi Gong meditation and movement practice, images from the Hubble Space Telescope, old maps, and her collection of nests, feathers, and other ephemera—Holsberry creates stunningly beautiful works that engage the viewer and encourage deeper reflection. Her pieces draw inspiration from nature and her fascination with migratory birds—which often appear as metaphorical symbols in her work —but her meditations on migration also delve deeper. Her works map emotional territory born from semi-annual trips to France.

Being somewhat nomadic by nature, I like to move about, establishing little studios wherever I land for a while. For the past decade, I have spent part of each year living and working in France, where I find inspiration in the rich cultural history and beauty of Europe – in particular, Paris. It is a place where serendipitous discoveries seem to lead me in unexpected creative directions.3

Additionally, she is moved by the experience of seeing family members and the increasing numbers of people being pushed and pulled around the globe; movement that needs to be expressed. Though deeply personal, Holsberry’s work maintains an important universality, drawing on the individual, yet shared, experience of moving from one place to another.4

Ann Holsberry: Hover, 2014, Cyano Gouache 72 in. x 38 in.
Ann Holsberry: Hover, 2014, Cyanotype & Gouache on paper, 72 in. x 38 in.

The name cyanotype was derived from the Greek name cyan, meaning “dark-blue impression.” 5 The cyanotype process, together with a number of other, older photographic processes, was revived by contemporary photographers in the 1960s The basic cyanotype recipe has not changed very much since Sir John Herschel introduced it in 1842.

Ann Holsberry: Towards the Seas 1, 2014, Cyano 72 in. x 38 in.
Ann Holsberry: Towards the Seas 1, 2014, Cyano 72 in. x 38 in.
Ann Holsberry: Towards the Sea 2, 2014, Cyno 72 in. x 38 in
Ann Holsberry: Towards the Sea 2, 2014, Cyno 72 in. x 38 in

Migration by Ann Holsberry from Tina Toriello on Vimeo.

Artist Statement

MIGRATION
I am fascinated by the movement of humans and animals across the globe, and am drawn to illustrate their webs and networks of transit. I am also fascinated by cosmology, in particular the way the earth and other heavenly bodies travel through space. Accordingly, my current work is inspired both by the movements of planets and stars, and by the complementary movements of animals and people across the earth.
To express these ideas, I work with cyanotype, one of the oldest alternative photographic processes. Cyanotype was the original process by which blueprints were created, and its blue color evokes skies and oceans, giving the works a vast, dreamlike, atmospheric quality. I begin each piece by painting the chemicals onto paper in the darkroom in varying patterns, after which I expose the prints in outdoor sunlight, sometimes working in locations over which flocks of migratory birds fly, or near oceans and rivers where whales and fish are migrating. Following the exposure process, I add gouache, ink, pastel, or wax to some of the works to further develop them as paintings.6

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An April Monday Morning Conversation: Modernism vs Contemporary.

 

Modernism and Contemporary design with Antiques

A Monday conversation on design to start the week:
Jim Gallagher, manager of Garden Court Antiques remarks on a question & dialogue posed to him over the weekend regarding modernism & contemporary interior design elements.

The Vermont Street Showroom is featuring some contemporary works in the coming months to show the exciting partnership to be had when mixing styles